Wednesday, March 7, 2007

Wrong

What's wrong with Canada?

First the House of Commons voted against crucial parts of the Canadian anti-terror law established after Sept. 11th attacks, and now an activist judge is basically ordering the Federal gov't of Canada to release the Egyptian terror suspect.

Some body tells me where Canada is heading...

3 comments:

Sherry said...

What's wrong with Canada? FRANCE!

Surfingaround said...

Well for one thing nothing is wrong with Canada. I am just surprised as an Iranian you don't realize how it violates basic human rights. Just because a government says some dude is guillty. We have all these evidence but "hey nobody can really see them". Sounds like what Canada tries not to be. You should read the ruling again before towing standard right wing line:

The high court found the current security certificate system violates the Charter of Rights and Freedom (Canada's bill of rights), Charter’s section 7 - the guarantee that the state will respect principles of fundamental justice whenever it acts to restrict an individual’s liberty or security of the person.

That means, the court said, the law must provide a fair hearing before an impartial judge, and respect the right of an individual to know the case against him, and the opportunity to answer allegations.

The current system allows “closed door” evidentiary hearings, and bars the individual suspected of being a risk to national security from hearing the evidence against him. That leaves judges in the awkward position of challenging the secret evidence, and providing a deportee with only a “summary” of the allegations against him.

Surfingaround said...

Just adding to the previous statement. It doesn't mean there won't be anti-terror law, just the government has to come up with a better one, that won't violate basic human rights. To me the previous security certificates was what the pro-US, pro-Canadian supporters rally against in other countries.

Reverse the role in foreign countries, i.e Egypt, same thing happens to one of us Canadians there. Do we want the same type of closed door, can't hear the charges against me type of hearing. If we are going to expect other countries to follow what we do. Then we better do it ourself.